Sensuality

Our bodies experience sensation through the five senses: touch, smell, sight, hearing, and taste. When perceived as enjoyable, any of these senses can be sensual.

Sensuality is based on the physiological and psychological enjoyment of one's own body and the bodies of others. As such, the enjoyment of sensuality can expand your awareness and increase your sense of comfort in and appreciation of your own body.

Sensuality and our senses

Touch: Our bodies are sensitive to touch and pressure

Smell: Human beings emit pheromones, which are chemical substances that attract sexual partners. We also may find some aromas, or smells pleasurable and sexually arousing.

Sight: Sight can play a role in our attraction to another individual. Our preferences for specific visual sights or erotic stimuli may vary by gender and from person to person.

Hearing: Some people believe that certain types of poetry, music, or other kinds of sounds can raise their level of sexual arousal. In some cases, hearing specific phrases or the sound of a particular voice may be arousing.

Taste: Some people believe that certain foods may stimulate sexual arousal. For example, chocolate contains endorphins. These proteins can create a sense of calm and good feeling, thereby potentially making a person feel more relaxed and more inclined to sexual activity.

Other parts of sensuality include the sexual response cycle because it is the mechanism that enables us to enjoy and respond to sexual pleasure.

Our body image is also important because whether or not we feel attractive and proud of our bodies influences our sensuality and many other aspects of our lives.

And finally, fantasy plays a role in sensuality as well. Our brain gives us the capacity to fantasize about sexual behaviours and experiences without having to act upon them.